{{streetaddress | titlecase}}

  • Chicago, IL
  • {{area | number:0}} sq. ft.
  • Zone {{zone}}
  • {{closestTransitStop().distance | number:0}} feet from {{closestTransitStop().name}}

Parcel is too far from a rail station to qualify for TOD benefits. You can still design your own proposal for the site.

Parcel is close to transit, but its zoning does not qualify it for TOD benefits. You can still design your own proposal for the site, however.

Chicago's TOD ordinance qualifies this parcel for increased density and reduced parking.

Chicago's TOD ordinance qualifies this parcel for reduced parking.

MPC's proposed TOD incentives would qualify this parcel for increased density and reduced parking.

Explore the effects of TOD

Use the sliders below to design your own proposal and see the benefits of dense, mixed-use development near transit or Start from scratch.

Start here

Retail space (sq. ft.)

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{{officeUnitLabel}} (sq. ft.)

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Residential units More options Fewer options

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Your proposal is about as dense as a typical Chicago courtyard building.
Your proposal is about half as dense as a typical Chicago courtyard building.
Your proposal is less than half as dense as a typical Chicago courtyard building.
Your proposal is about {{estimatedDensity(1) | number:1}} times as dense as a typical Chicago courtyard building.

Community impact Potential under current zoning Your proposal

Annual local retail sales

New development brings more residents and workers to a neighborhood, increasing sales for all local businesses. More »

For reference, a small retailer may take in as little as $300,000 in sales per year, while a medium-sized restaurant may take in $1 to $3 million a year.

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Tax revenue (over 10 years)

Property, sales and transfer taxes Close

Tax revenue supports the public services that keep our city running: schools, streets, police officers, parks and transit. More »

For reference, the recent Argyle Street improvement project, which will improve conditions for pedestrians and add landscaping, cost about $3 million. The new Pullman Community Center cost $15 million to build. An eight-car Chicago Transit Authority train costs about $19 million to buy.

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Property tax
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Sales tax
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Transfer tax
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On-site jobs

Development near transit helps to create jobs—and provides people with better access to jobs across the city and region. More »

New development near transit can bring new jobs to a community and add a base of additional consumers to support local businesses. Commercial, retail and manufacturing spaces focused in areas near transit lines are accessible to people looking for a job—even those who do not have access to a personal automobile.

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Residents

More housing units generate more tax revenue, and more people living in an area increases local retail sales. More »

Over the past 60 years, the number of people living near Chicago's transit system has declined by 30 percent. There's plenty of room to add more people living and working near our buses and trains.

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Annual transit rides

People who live and work near public transportation are far more likely to use buses and trains, as well as walk and bike. More »

By focusing investment in areas near its transit lines, Chicago will be encouraging growth without encouraging traffic congestion. Downtown Chicago's residential population grew by 96 percent between 2000 and 2010 and employment there increased as well, but traffic on major arterials such as Lake Shore Drive actually declined between 2005 and 2009 because the additional people often used buses and trains instead of driving.

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Affordable housing units

New development that provides people of all incomes with opportunities to live near transit is good for families and Chicago's economy. More »

For some projects, the City's zoning process requires developers to provide a share of affordable housing units on site.

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In-lieu fee: {{housingUnitsWithFees().fee | currencyRounded}}

Parking Requirements

Parking demand Close

On-site parking is often required for development projects, but people living and working near transit are less likely to drive. More »

If the project is in a TOD zone, developers can apply to the Zoning Board of Appeals for additional parking reductions. Demand estimates for commercial spaces are for workers only, not for visitors to retail stores or other businesses.

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Commercial estimated parking demand
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Residential estimated parking demand
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Disclaimer: This tool allows users to estimate effects of development in neighborhoods across the city of Chicago. Result accuracy is not guaranteed, nor is redevelopment of any parcel specifically endorsed by the Metropolitan Planning Council. Assumptions are based on market-rate, non-subsidized projects. View methodology »

Selected property information courtesy of Chicago Cityscape.